New site


Hi! I know it’s been a while since I’ve written.

via GIPHY

I’ve been crazy-busy with:

A) Finishing up my MBA.

B) Starting a new job and studying for some certifications for that new job

C) Baby! (Now toddler!)

and

D) Feeling blocked because of my writing environment.

I’ve loved Wordpress for a very long time. Since I got started blogging in 2009, in fact. For all of that time, Wordpress allowed me to publish quickly without worrying about the back-end details, namely since Mr. B handled a lot of that in exchange for delicious dinners. I still love Wordpress and think it’s an extremely important tool for the open Internet.
I still 100% recommend it to anyone looking to get into writing online.

But,over the past four years, two things happened at the same time for me: Wordpress started getting harder and harder to maintain and having a blog held a lot less joy and a lot more headache. And the longer I worked in tech, the more I appreciated version control and static pages, two tools that help keep track of changes in websites and allow for the free movement of blog posts into almost any platform.
I also started really hating how bloated Wordpress was and how it always made me update stuff.

Additionally, I started getting some heavy traffic from viral posts that made my server keel over and die, which in turn made me question the regular uptime of the site, and I worried that whenver I tweeted out a link to my blog, my site wouldn’t be there, frustrating the reader.

So, every time I tried to start a new post, I felt blocked by the Wordpress environment and the thought that it wouldn’t be a good user experience, and I’d get writer’s block.

I weighed my options carefully. On the one hand, running Wordpress on my own server meant complete control over my content, no matter what happened, ever. On the other, running on GitPages gives flexibility and stability, with the potential to quickly migrate in case the platform becomes more annoying or closed. And, isn’t that always the tradeoff?

I’ve switched to Jekyll. Although it is harder to set up, is a lot nicer than Wordpress in a lot of ways, the most important of which is portability of writing, something that’s important for any writer. It is also a lot more stable, especially since the version I’m running is backed up by GitPages, and comments are backed up to Disqus. I myself am not a huge fan of outsourcing any comments or contents, or comments that force the reader to identify themselves in any way other than email address, but we’ll go with this for now, and you can let me know whether this is a huge issue for you as a reader.

The migration from Wordpress has been keeping me up much more than the baby for the past couple months. But if I don’t release this site now, I’m going to go insane. So, here it is, warts and all.

Namely, here are the things I’m still working on:

Thanks for your patience, and if you notice anything awry, please send me an email or tweet.

<3