Monthly Archives of: December 2012

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Chico y Rita

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So good. Love. Life. Loss. Gain. Revolucion. Dizzy Gillespie. Sex. Shoe-throwing. All in cartoon form!

It’s like Disney for people whole like to listen to NPR and say offhandedly, “You know, I was recently watching a cartoon about the jazz movements in pre and post-revolution Cuba” and make everyone roll their eyes.  The only people worse than people who absolutely cannot stop talking about the artistic integrity of this film and how amazing it was are those people who listen to Buena Vista Social Club and who can even tell you their favorite song (Dos gardenias per te .) Those people who would call the movie visually stunning and full of heart.

God, I hate  those people.

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Our religion is really just our parents

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haha

 

Last Sunday, I found out that I had passed both of my classes this semester, and even gotten an A in one of them. The feeling of exultation, of luxury, of not having to do anything except eat and work on my novel until January 20th was amazing.

“Let’s celebrate,” Mr. B said. “What do you want to do?”

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High-class Vegas Friday Links

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Some lucky dude from GQ goes undercover at Vegas’s biggest nightclub to find out what makes it tick.

An academic paper that says “ Couples where wife earns more than the husband are less satis ed with their marriage and are more likely to divorce.”

My brother Carl, a crate-digger and amateur ethnomusicologist of sorts, hosts a radio program on WRIR, an indie radio station in Richmond, VA. The latest episode of his show is available here for download, and includes a batch of rare, wonderful Yiddish popular music from the ’40s and ’50s on 78 RPM vinyl”

Ian Frazier writes about why travelers can’t exaggerate anymore.

“Going through dating profiles is like reading the same book over and over again. Everyone is happy and loves to laugh. Everyone likes beer and coffee and rain.”

This post  from a fellow analyst was very relevant to me.

A man asks strangers on the streets of NY about their holiday wishes.

How to party at the State Department

“Preparing for my job interview”

Cute painting called “Impressionists”

 

 

 

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Nassim Taleb

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From the Telegraph

Still my favorite philosopher/economist/misanthrope. Still agree with him on nearly everything.

Antifragile resembles a self-help book, though it is difficult to imagine any other self-help book as intemperate and cranky. The author is a tireless self-aggrandiser, boasting of his gargantuan reading habits; of being a weightlifter, ready to physically slap down detractors; and a gourmand, recommending fine wines and camomile tea to ease a troubled mind.

Here are some excerpts from press about him+ Antifragile:

Actually, Antifragile feels like a compendium of people and things Taleb doesn’t like. He is, for instance, annoyed by editors who “overedit,” when what they should really do is hunt for typos; unctuous, fawning travel assistants; “bourgeois bohemian bonus earners”; meetings of any kind; appointments of any kind; doctors; Paul Krugman; Thomas Friedman; nerds; bureaucrats; air conditioning; television; soccer moms; smooth surfaces; Harvard Business School; business schools in general; bankers at the Federal Reserve; bankers in general; economists; sissies; fakes; “bureaucrato-journalistic” talk; Robert Rubin; Google News; marketing; neckties; “the inexorable disloyalty of Mother Nature”; regular shoes.

And:

A reader could easily run out of adjectives to describe Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s new book “Antifragile: Things That Gain From Disorder.” The first ones that come to mind are: maddening, bold, repetitious, judgmental, intemperate, erudite, reductive, shrewd, self-indulgent, self-congratulatory, provocative, pompous, penetrating, perspicacious and pretentious.

And:

He also comes across as a helluva personality: irascible, finicky, vain, prone to fits of pique at those who mischaracterize his ideas (uh-oh, better watch out), disdainful of journalists (double uh-oh), a weightlifter, too (this is your third and final warning).

On the other hand, he has habits I admire: He told the New Scientist he only goes to doctors if he’s really sick, he takes a dose of local water (a drop, no more) when visiting India (good for the immune system) and apparently he’s never been in debt

And:

You’re critical of various groups who claim to be able to predict and manage the future – which, in your opinion, has done the most damage? The most damaging group are economists; probably the most damaging individual is [former chairman of the US Federal Reserve] Alan Greenspan, and maybe also [current Fed chairman] Ben Bernanke and [US treasury secretary] Timothy Geithner. The reason I’m against the top-down state isn’t so much theoretical, but because of what I call having skin in the game – bureaucrats have no personal stake in their decisions. I don’t tell you what I predict; I tell you what’s in my portfolio. So economics-wise, I don’t want people to tell me what to do; I want to know what they’re doing.

And:

“Exactly!” says Taleb. Once you get over the idea that you’re reading some sort of popular economics book and realise that it’s basically Nassim Taleb’s Rules for Life, it’s actually rather enjoyable. Highly eccentric, it’s true, but very readable and something like a chivalric code d’honneur for the 21st century. Modern life is akin to a chronic stress injury, he says. And the way to combat it is to embrace randomness in all its forms: live true to your principles, don’t sell your soul and watch out for the carbohydrates