Did You Know that Our Maybe-House Has Evil Spirits? Also, here’s a picture of me eating bread.


So, in preparation for possibly-maybe-our new house at the end of the month (if nothing goes wrong, tfu, tfu, tfu, knock on wood, eat a chicken bone and whatever the hell it is you do to stop from believing in the pit of your stomach that you will never, ever be a homeowner), I’ve been researching why men need to carry women over the threshold of their new house.

Because I desperately want Mr. B to carry me and he doesn’t like [So, in preparation for possibly-maybe-our new house at the end of the month (if nothing goes wrong, tfu, tfu, tfu, knock on wood, eat a chicken bone and whatever the hell it is you do to stop from believing in the pit of your stomach that you will never, ever be a homeowner), I’ve been researching why men need to carry women over the threshold of their new house.

Because I desperately want Mr. B to carry me and he doesn’t like](https://vkblog.github.io/2010/02/01/rabbit-rabbit-rabbit/) because they are  “bullshit” (or maybe because he’s afraid he’ll get a hernia, which is more likely.)  So for every superstition I follow, I have to somehow scientifically prove to him that they result in real life changes.  I know. I’m rolling my eyes, too.  Superstition > science.

Practicing the Russian tradition/superstition of eating bread and salt so that your home is prosperous and never hungry. Hey, man. Whatever it takes to avoid bad superstitions. Especially if it means more carbs.

Here’s what I found (I know, I know, it’s The Knot. Ew.  I’m sorry):

The ancient Romans started it: the bride had to show that she was not at all crazy about leaving her father’s home, and so was dragged over the threshold to her groom’s house. Ancients also believed that evil spirits, in a last-ditch effort to curse the couple, hovered at the threshold of their new home, so the bride had to be lifted to ensure that the spirits couldn’t enter her body through the soles of her feet. These days, it’s just fun!

Evil spirits.

Does [So, in preparation for possibly-maybe-our new house at the end of the month (if nothing goes wrong, tfu, tfu, tfu, knock on wood, eat a chicken bone and whatever the hell it is you do to stop from believing in the pit of your stomach that you will never, ever be a homeowner), I’ve been researching why men need to carry women over the threshold of their new house.

Because I desperately want Mr. B to carry me and he doesn’t like [So, in preparation for possibly-maybe-our new house at the end of the month (if nothing goes wrong, tfu, tfu, tfu, knock on wood, eat a chicken bone and whatever the hell it is you do to stop from believing in the pit of your stomach that you will never, ever be a homeowner), I’ve been researching why men need to carry women over the threshold of their new house.

Because I desperately want Mr. B to carry me and he doesn’t like](https://vkblog.github.io/2010/02/01/rabbit-rabbit-rabbit/) because they are  “bullshit” (or maybe because he’s afraid he’ll get a hernia, which is more likely.)  So for every superstition I follow, I have to somehow scientifically prove to him that they result in real life changes.  I know. I’m rolling my eyes, too.  Superstition > science.

Practicing the Russian tradition/superstition of eating bread and salt so that your home is prosperous and never hungry. Hey, man. Whatever it takes to avoid bad superstitions. Especially if it means more carbs.

Here’s what I found (I know, I know, it’s The Knot. Ew.  I’m sorry):

The ancient Romans started it: the bride had to show that she was not at all crazy about leaving her father’s home, and so was dragged over the threshold to her groom’s house. Ancients also believed that evil spirits, in a last-ditch effort to curse the couple, hovered at the threshold of their new home, so the bride had to be lifted to ensure that the spirits couldn’t enter her body through the soles of her feet. These days, it’s just fun!

Evil spirits.

Does](https://vkblog.github.io/2011/03/23/the-world-is-going-crazy-so-hopefully-reading-about-my-radon-problems-will-cheer-you-up/) count as evil spirits?

Because it should.

Our house has evil spirits. More than 4 picocuries per liter’s worth. How’s that for scientific evidence?

P.S.B.T.W, did you know that the threshold is a bad place in general?  I found this really awesome book that talks about it, although it’s cut off. Boo :(But you can get it as a FREE PDF!!! And you can find out all about the superstition of thresholds and how it comes from the Old Testament.

Anyway, where was I, again?

Oh yeah.

Radon!

Which sounds suspiciously like Dagon, actually.