Big Changes


Dear Blog Readers,

I love you.  You are the rain to my desert. I love you so much that I want you to get as much enjoyment as possible out of my blog.  And since D.C. provides low concentrations of my primary satire material-that is, Russian Jews (and really, there’s only so much I can mock Mr. B since he still peels my oranges for me,) we are moving (back) to Philadelphia.

Remember this?

It’s been a tough six (seven?) months since then, most of which I have spent wrestling with myself, playing acrobatic mindgames of “what if this and what if that” with the Arlington moon  as I-395 outside my window passively hummed by.

This decision was made infinitely harder because now there are two of us impacted by any decision either makes, and even though it’s a decision we’ve reached and agreed to mutually, our lives will still be in a mild chaos for the next several months, because, who the hell is going to peel my oranges in Philly? (did I use the word decision enough in that last paragraph?)

There is nothing (except the traffic and Michaele Salahi) that Mr. B and I don’t love about D.C. For us, it is the perfect place to live.  It is probably my second-favorite place in the world (aside from the Tel Aviv beach at night.)  We could have sunny breakfasts every weekend, take in the embassies, go see a famous authors, National Book Festivals, dragon boats, meet really cool people, and on and on.

However, we have come to several realizations.

The last one is most critical.

I’m starting a new technical writing/project management job in Philadelphia in October, which I’m looking forward to very much because it will be a huge move forward in my career and I get to do more writing (God help us all.)  I am  sad to be leaving the immediate world of economics but, depending on what I decide, I may re-enter it again as a master’s student.

So, like [<p style="text-align: center;"> </p>

Dear Blog Readers,

I love you.  You are the rain to my desert. I love you so much that I want you to get as much enjoyment as possible out of my blog.  And since D.C. provides low concentrations of my primary satire material-that is, Russian Jews (and really, there’s only so much I can mock Mr. B since he still peels my oranges for me,) we are moving (back) to Philadelphia.

Remember this?

It’s been a tough six (seven?) months since then, most of which I have spent wrestling with myself, playing acrobatic mindgames of “what if this and what if that” with the Arlington moon  as I-395 outside my window passively hummed by.

This decision was made infinitely harder because now there are two of us impacted by any decision either makes, and even though it’s a decision we’ve reached and agreed to mutually, our lives will still be in a mild chaos for the next several months, because, who the hell is going to peel my oranges in Philly? (did I use the word decision enough in that last paragraph?)

There is nothing (except the traffic and Michaele Salahi) that Mr. B and I don’t love about D.C. For us, it is the perfect place to live.  It is probably my second-favorite place in the world (aside from the Tel Aviv beach at night.)  We could have sunny breakfasts every weekend, take in the embassies, go see a famous authors, National Book Festivals, dragon boats, meet really cool people, and on and on.

However, we have come to several realizations.

The last one is most critical.

I’m starting a new technical writing/project management job in Philadelphia in October, which I’m looking forward to very much because it will be a huge move forward in my career and I get to do more writing (God help us all.)  I am  sad to be leaving the immediate world of economics but, depending on what I decide, I may re-enter it again as a master’s student.

So, like ](http://modite.com/blog/2010/09/20/moving-to-a-new-city/) girls my age who are grappling with the same type of life changes right now, I am terrified and sad to be leaving friends and Russian-pessimistic and need you to tell me it will all be o.k. in the comments I am excited  as we continue the next chapter.

Luckily, economists believe that everything evens out in the long-run, which is what I’m gunning for as we move up and out.

P.S. If you live in Philly and read this blog, holla.