Friday Links

Mr. B and I are headed to NYC this weekend, to try to get some biking in, some world-class eating, and to dock at our mother ship.

From the blogs

  1. Emily in a tough post on being Jewish
  2. Roba on creepy abandoned places
  3. My girl MODG is all kinds of knocked up!
  4. Twenty Four at heart on a club no normal person would join
  5. Marginal Revolution: What your blogging style says about you
  6. The Weakonomist on how marketers exploit you

From the Internet

  1. Does anonymous journalism work?
  2. My hero Gary Shteyngart’s new novel
  3. Picky eaters: more than a kid thing
  4. Cute ice cream in Istanbul video
  5. Sky over Uzbekistan
  6. Baseline Scenario on medical billing
  7. What’s an econ major good for?

Vicki

2 thoughts on “Friday Links

  1. Vicky thank you so much for this. I didn’t realize that I was part of a growing wave of fury, and it’s nice to see I’m not alone. For a variety of reasons, I do believe that Israel’s relationship with the Diaspora is changing in very real ways, and I honestly think it’s for the best, for all of us. But right now, I am good and pissed off. And nervous, because lately the Israeli rabbinate has taken to selectively revoking people’s conversions (it’s a legal thing — essentially saying: Well, now we see that you must have been lying back then, so that legal decision to convert you is null and void). But holy God, one has to say something, right?

    And you know what, it never occurred to me that it might be hard for Jews who had once been Jews in the Soviet Union to produce any documents. But when you mentioned it yesterday? Yeah…. When rules get in the way of humanity, the rules need to go.

    1. I don’t know if I necessarily see Israel’s relationship as changing so much as I see the diaspora’s perception of the relationship changing. For the record, I don’t think Israel owes the diaspora anything other than to act as a place of refuge and a homeland, even though American Jews continue to pour money into the country in hopes of getting the Israeli government to bend to whatever agenda they’re for. And if the conversion rules are those as they are in Israel, then, whatever Israel decides is its own decision and shouldn’t impact Judaism abroad.

      However, when it impacts its own citizens, we have a huge problem. Your post adressed it in a very brave way.

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