Vicki goes to the World Bank


This week, I had lunch at the World Bank. It was AWESOME.

Since I love international politics, international economics, and pretty much international anything (international Nutella), me going to lunch at the World Bank is like a hypochondriac being invited to tour the Centers for Disease Control.

From the moment I set foot in the door, I instantly forgot about the concern and criticism surrounding the effectiveness of the Bank’s programs (found here, here, and here.)  I was in awe.  There was artwork from around the world.  You could go to different lectures, about Iraq or water security, or any other international development topic you could think of.  People walked around in both suits and kimonos.  (Well, ok, not kimonos, but they were dressed pretty awesome-ly.)

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Near the courtyard in the middle is a fountain (but no Oompa Loompas)

Not only was the building gorgeous, but the thrill of being surrounded by so many people doing so many different things in the realm of international economics was very exciting, not only on a personal, but also on a professional level.  Even though D.C. is the best place to build your career if you are trying to be an international economic expert, I should admit I haven’t tried my hardest to network and join the community, the biggest reason being that it might be possible for me to move to Philadelphia in the (near?) future, reducing that opportunity and severing ties significantly.  A dilemma I always have is whether I should work on building my network here and now given that I might not be here to leverage it in the future.

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Beautiful hallway with paintings along it

Although I couldn’t help thinking that the building and all of the artwork was paid for partly with American tax dollars, it was a real  treat. The sushi was delicious, too.

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Blurry pictures don't do it justice

I’m going to have to come back to further investigate.  The sushi situation.

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This sushi massacre clearly deserves the implementation of economic sanctions.